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National Logistic Command
Nationaal Logistiek Commando (NLC)

Part I | Part II | Operational Role

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Unit Location Peace Strength War Strength
Staff and Staff Company
National Logistic Command
Deventer 27/24/2/45 (98)
55/58/125/45 (283)
 Replacement Holding Detachment
25/16/19 (60)
 
225 Ammunition Supply Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
225 Ammunition Supply Battalion [a]
5/8/11 (24)
127 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
128 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
561 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
562 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
563 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
564 Ammunition Company [a] 7/22/232 (261)
246 Labour Company [b] 6/15/146 (167)

581 Ammunition Depot Company Breda 3/31/-/79 (113) 4/39/109/79 (231)
582 Ammunition Depot Company Kampen 4/20/1/61 (86) 5/50/86/61 (202)
   
105 Supply Services Depots and Workshops Eefde 3/14/9/141 (167) 4/18/42/141 (205)
119 Victuals Depot Harskamp 2/7/-/41 (50) 11/56/449/41 (557)
124 POL Depot [c] Bathmen 2/10/13/66 (91) 17/48/374/63 (502)
630 Supply Services Depot Soesterberg 2/6/16/72 (96) 2/9/59/72 (142)
   
150 Depot Company [d] Utrecht 4/4/-/163 (171) 5/13/90/163 (271)
572 Depot Company Lettele 2/9/3/81 (95) 4/19/107/81 (211)
555 Field Park Company [e] Stroe 3/7/-/138 (148) 6/18/66/122 (212)
573 Collection Point [d] Soesterberg 3/8/8/206 (225) 7/14/50/205 (276)
   
102 Repair Workshop [f] Wezep 7/80/14/223 (324) 7/68/5/215 (294)
502 Repair Workshop [d] [g] Alphen aan den Rijn 6/12/11/105 (134) 7/15/28/105 (155)
569 Repair Workshop [h] Dongen 5/48/-/239 (292) 5/50/45/239 (339)
570 Repair Workshop [i] Uddel 7/74/-/309 (390) 10/82/118/249 (459)
   
527 Central Electronic Workshop [d] [j] Dongen 5/64/32/214 (315) 8/55/49/214 (326)
574 Tank Workshop [d] [k] Leusden 7/8/20/501 (536) 7/4/-/501 (512)
575 Central Technical Services Workshop [d] [l] Utrecht 5/8/-/475 (488) 5/8/-/475 (488)
637 Central Supply Services Workshop [d] Woerden 5/4/-/222 (231) 5/4/-/222 (231)
566 Ammunition Renovation Company [d] Tul en 't Waal 4/33/89/26 (152) 4/29/83/26 (142)
Central Instruction Tools Workshop Breda -/-/-/22 (22) -/-/-/22 (22)

Notes

a. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1
b. RIM company, filled by mobilisable platoons that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 646 Labour Company between four and twenty months prior to mobilisation.1 8
c.POL: Petrol, Oil, Lubricants.
d.Handled basic supply and maintenance tasks (rather than direct support) under functional command of Director of Materiel Royal Army, through his Logistic Installations Department (Afdeling Logistieke Installaties, ALI).2
e. Administered and maintained the Royal Army's technical and wartime materiel reserves. 119 Field Park Company (mobilisable, Corps Logistic Command) would likely perform a similar role for 1 (NL) Corps in wartime. In 1985 the company lacked sufficient warehouses and personnel, though in both matters moderate expansions were underway.3
f. Handled third and fourth echelon maintenance of tracked vehicles and artillery ("geschut": probably including mortars).4
g.Handled fifth echelon maintenance of engineer materiel.4
h.Handled third and fourth echelon maintenance of wheeled vehicles and small-calibre weapons in the provinces of Zeeland, North Brabant and Limburg.4
i.Handled third and fourth echelon maintenance of wheeled vehicles and small-calibre weapons in the Netherlands, with the exception of Zeeland, North Brabant and Limburg Provinces.4
j.Peacetime organisation. In wartime the subordinate 722 Materiel Support Team (for 101 Artillery Survey Battalion) would operate under Corps Logistic Command.
k.Handled fifth echelon maintenance of main battle tanks and other tracked vehicles.4 Between 1982 and 1987 573 Tank Workshop executed the problematic Leopard 1 upgrading programme (see further for example 13 Armoured Brigade and the notes and footnotes there).
l.Handled fifth echelon maintenance of wheeled vehicles.4



Part I | Part II | Operational Role

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UnitLocationPeace StrengthWar Strength
401 Map Distribution Platoon Ruinen -/4/5/2 (11) -/4/15/2 (21)
   
810 Transport Group Deventer 4/12/88/33 (137) 195/528/4178/12 (4913)
   
201 Service Support Command [a]
Staff and Support Company
201 Service Support Command
Emstek (GE) 3/27/-/8 (38) 15/25/67/2 (109)
126 Ammunition Supply Point Company [b] 4/16/137 (157)
104 Mixed Supply Services Company [c] 7/36/185 (228)
284 Labour Company [d] 6/15/146 (167)
240 Repair Company Wheeled Vehicles [e] 8/46/159 (213)
260 Field Dressing Station Company [f] 13/18/124/2 (157)
389 Security Infantry Company [g] 6/21/143 (170)
203 Military Constabulary Squadron [h] 6/24/159 (189)
Warehouse Complex 201 Support Command [i] Emstek (GE) 1/26/8 (35) -/11/- (11)
   
401 Service Support Command [j]
2/7/40 (49)
   
203 Medical Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
203 Medical Battalion [k]
10/14/24/2 (50)
287 Ambulance Company [l] 4/8/87 (99)
734 Ambulance Company [l] 4/8/87 (99)
729 Ambulance Bus Company [m] 4/7/142 (153)
736 Stretcher Company [m] 5/7/174 (186)
740 Reception Company [m] 11/7/82 (100)
A Company, 747 Field Hospital Battalion [m] [n] 8/12/57 (77)
   
204 Medical Battalion
Staff and Staff Detachment
204 Medical Battalion [k]
5/8/21 (34)
761 Ambulance Train Company [m] 21/53/217 (291)
283 Medical Reception and Evacuation Company [m] 5/9/94 (108)
741 Medical Reception and Evacuation Company [m] 5/9/94 (108)
   
301 Light Aircraft Squadron [o] 4/3/4 (11)
   
National Logistic Command Peace Strength: 113/514/311/3472 (4410)
National Logistic Command War Strength: 604/1712/9889/3361 (15566)

Notes

   
a. 201 Service Support Command would in wartime primarily regulate the flow of goods between storage facilities in the Netherlands and the corps supply point areas in West Germany. These goods mainly comprised ammunition, fuel and (non-perishable) foods. In addition the command would regulate the evacuation flows of wounded personnel, prisoners of war, the repatriation of dead bodies, and the moving-up of replacement personnel detachments. For its main role, adjusting the supply flows to the needs of 1 (NL) Corps, the command would operate a large depot area around Cloppenburg (GE), which area comprised a number of warehouses and field storage facilities, effectively forming the main supply hub between National Logistic Command and 1 (NL) Corps.5
b. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 149 Ammunition Supply Point Company (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
c. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 201 Mixed Supply Point Company (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
d. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 411 Labour Company (RIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
e. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 115 Corps Repair Company (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
f. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 261 Field Dressing Station Company (RIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
g. Filled by mobilisable personnel that had fulfilled their active-duty period in 435 Mobile Security Infantry Company up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
h. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 51 Military Constabulary Squadron (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
i. Formed in January 1986. Wartime organisation; under command of Corps Logistic Command in peacetime.
j. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1
k. Filled by mobilisable personnel from Staff and Staff Detachment, 101 Medical Battalion (GRIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
l. Filled by mobilisable personnel from 280 Ambulance Company (RIM) after their fourteen to sixteen-month RIM period in that unit had expired, up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 8
m. Filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to twelve and a half years prior to mobilisation.1
n. The remainder of 747 Field Hospital Battalion under command of 783 Medical Group.
o. Partly filled by personnel from the general pool of mobilisable reserves (vrij-indeelbaar bestand) that had fulfilled their active-duty period in relevant functions up to eight and a half years prior to mobilisation.1 Would operate Alouette III helicopters; see also Light Aviation Group.6

Operational Role 7


National Logistic Command provided logistical support (supply, materiel support, transport and medical support) to
As indicated Part I, note d, basic supply and maintenance functions were executed under direct control of Director of Materiel Royal Army. From 1986 these functions were transferred to National Logistic Command, as were, in the following years, many of the logistic functions handled by National Territorial Command and Royal Army Training Command. <  

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1. NIMH 205A/10, Aflossing van mobilisabele eenheden en -aanvullingen d.d. 27 mei 1980. Ibid., d.d. 11 november 1983. Ibid., d.d. 17 juni 1985.
2.NL-HaNA, archiefinventaris 2.13.121, 12, 14. Under functional command (onder functioneel bevel): a separate command relationship giving a commander or functionary a task-specific authority over a unit not under his command. VS 2-7200, 24.
3. Tabak, Er bestaat, 28-31. In 1985 the company hired sixteen civilian personnel in advance of authorisation (included in the table above), in 1986 two new warehouses were built. Ibid, 29.
4.Silvius, Zelfbeheer, 60-61. This article is from early 1990, but cross-reference with Van Woensel, 50 Jaar, 241-242 and Elands et al., 250 jaar, 243 indicates that the roles of these units had not changed since 1985 or earlier. 
5.Roos, Van marketentster, 338.
6. Pilots and technicians belonged to the Royal Air Force; it may therefore be that these are not included in the personnel strength above. Helfferich, Nederlandse Koninklijke, 130. Alouette III: De Jong, Vlucht, 395-396.
7.NL-HaNA 2.12.56, inv. nr. 1952, VVKM 162 Oorlogsmemorandum der Koninklijke Marine 1981-1982, 3-6. Hoffenaar en Schoenmaker, Met de blik, 299-300. Roos, op. cit., 337, 349. Roozenbeek, In dienst, 196-197. Van Woensel, op. cit., 241-242.
8. RIM was the Dutch acronym for Direct Influx into Mobilisable Units (Rechtstreekse Instroming in Mobilisabele Eenheden). GRIM was a variant of this system, meaning "Largely RIM" (Grotendeels Rechtstreekse Instroming in Mobilisabele Eenheden). For a survey of the Royal Army's unit filling and reserve system see Gijsbers, Blik in de smidse, 2222-2231; Selles, Personele vulling; Berghuijs, Opleiding, 14-23. In English: Isby and Kamps, Armies, 341-343; Sorrell, Je Maintiendrai, 94-96; Van Vuren, The Royal Netherlands Army TodayMilitary Review April 1982, 23-28.